Faksimile

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a
6
n
Arthur
Florian Schubart Mr. GroRGE TROLLOPE.
the act-
Alexander Weihga-t Mr. Rrpek HAnbisd.
of Hi
Dr. Lantner Mr. HoWARD STURGk.
other
Dr. Tann Mr. Ebnrsb Gwes.
The l:
Juliaon Paschanda Miss ISABEL GREY.
pleasi
Scene: An Extra Ward in the Vienna General Hospital.
humo:
* HOW HE LIED 70 HER HUSBAND.“
imita
Bz Brnxann Susw.
whor
Her Lovor Mr. GkANVILLE BARKER.
Sout
Her Husband Mr. A. G. Poczros.
by a
Hierself Miss Gakraupe KINGSTOs.
than
Scene: Her Flat in Cromweli-road.
acter
Of the three one-act plays produced vesterday
pleas
afternoo at the abovetheatre“ Inthe Hospital,
spiri
transiated by Christopher Horne from the German
Dagn
of Arthur Schnitzler, proved farthe most interest¬
the 1
ing. Nor was it auything but a reliefto find it
was 1
travel beyond the obvious scope suggested by its
of he
titie, that of some wearisome study of disease and
Ne
death in the old but, let us hope, by now dis¬
credited manner of the th#t#re lihre. There was
hears
death in it, to be sure, but onlg in its mest, humane
aspect, coming to Rademacher, the broken-down
journalist, as relief and rest alter a liseof much
her c
toil and disappointment. And, best of all, there
choo:
was evidence in it ofthat higher intelligence,
that of the heart, in which as a rule this descrip- home
accor
tion of plry is so wofully deseient. The old
not r.
theatrical sentimentality, with its passion for a
old f.
happy ending at whatever cost, was suhliciently
afit,
tiresome; vet it was scarcelv more repugnant to
seldo
common sense than the raideur Which for some
this
time past has marked the development of modern
andt
dramatie themes. To that “ In the Hospital“
rathe
forms a welcome exception, and, admirably acted
any o
as it was by all concerned. thoroughly deserved
recei:
the hearty reception it enjoyed.
by M
The chief honours of therepresentation rest with
and I.
Mr. J. D. Beveridge, wbese performance of the
as in
dying Rademacher was worthy of the highest
date,
praise. Tie man has been a failure, mainly, one
stage
feels, tnrough his own fault, and nowon his death¬
for
bed has only theonedesireleft, the desirewhich all
suppe
his journalistie life he has been probably indulging,
Here
that of gratilying, and for the last time, his spite
made
and revenge. Tothat end he begs the doctor to
bring him his old friend Weibgart, an eminent
made
Tand successful poet. Years ago they quarrelled
once
and parted, and now Rademacher’s one wish is to
livel
humiliate him by telling him to his face that he
t#
has been his wife’s lover, thatheandsbehave often
form
discussed him disparagingly together, and that
Weihgart's wife is as fully convinced of his
piece
Th
complete nullity as his old friend Rademacher.
selec
The scene is acted before us in a sort of dress
rehearsal of it with Schubart, a young actor dying
(Mis
also in the hospital of consumption; yet when
Weihgart comes something touches Rademacher,
than
and he feels he can no longer do it. What that
agal
the t
something is is conveyed to us with extreme
delicacy and subtlety by Mr. Beveridge. Itis
habi
not exactly pity for Weihgart andtheconfessionhe
play
makes of the insecurity of his position owing to the
aver
persisteney with which the new generation are
knockingathis door. Itis, one feels, acombination ot
Mis
elements, and chief among them the recollection
rem
of the day when they were friends, and the desire
of dying with some purer feeling in his heart than
cou
that of gratified revenge. So Weihgart goes, with
bru
his belief in his wise intact, and Rademacher dies,
whi
a better man than probably he ever lived. Acted
as it was, by Mr. George Trollope as Schubart and
abl.
by Mr. Rudge Harding as Weihgart,“ In the
giv
Hospital'' created a considerable impression and
We
is very well worth seeing.
tha
In“ How He Lied to Her Husband'' Mr.
hot
Beruard Shaw provides a fairly amusing half
hour'’s entertainment for those at any rate who
dan
know his“ Candida.' For an authorto eritieise
his own play is not new; it has been done, for
instance, by Molière in bis“ Critique de 1’Ecole rec
of
In Mr. Shaw’s hands the criti¬
des Femmes.
SWC
eism partakes rather of the nature of ridicuie; an
gav
Tattitude towards his own performance no one, we
con
take it, has the right to cavil at, seeing who it is
hur
assumes it. It served to amuse an audience,
val
most of whom were probably familiar with the
pa¬
work ridieuled, and it was well acted by Mr.
Mr.
Granville Barker as the lover, Mr. A. G. Poulton
wil
asthe husband, and Miss Gertrude Kingston as
Uthe wise.
Mr. W. B. Teats's“ Pot of Broth,“ which
stands first on the programme, has been several
times seen before in London and needs nofurther
notice in detail. Mr. Robert Pateman as the
tramp was extremely clever, though it secmns to
us the Irish tramp does nothing that his English
it
counterpart in equal need of food might not very
well have been capable of. His chief difficulty
weuld have been to find in this conntry a woman
al
so simpie and gullible as Sibby Concely.
7
THE STANDARD, WEDNESDAY. MARCH 1, 102
ERRT-BOATS
COURT THIEATRE.
A TRIPLE BILL.
SERVIC E
A good many people have found their way.to
the Court Theatre of late, since the“ Vedrenve¬
Barker Matendes“ have been in progress. Such play¬
goers may be cordially advised to repeat their visit,
and those who have not been to follow the example
while the present“triple bill is being given; for pier
two of the three pieces are something a good deal
ing,
more than merely worth seeing. The first of the
the
three is of small acconnt. This is Tüe Pot of
Hal
Broth, by Mr. W. B. Yeats, nominally a farce, but at
nart
best no more than verv faintly amusing. Abungry
abe
tramp—the scene is in Ireland—calls at a cottage in
com
search of a meal. The woman is mean, and, gues¬¬
tele
ing his errand, refuses before he asks. Heis artfal,
to
and producing a stoue from his pocket, teils her
that it has magio properties, that placed simplv have
char
in a cooking pot it will produce excellent
broth. She believes, it is put to the test, mas:
chan
the man, however, artfully contriving to add in¬
gredients, and he leaves the stone, taking with him
fron
in exchange a chicken and a boctle of whisky. Mr.
sulat
Pateman did what was possible in this over-elaborated
like
trifle with the part of the wayfarer.
into
“ IN THE HOSPITAL.“
The second piece, Jn the Hospital, translated byhour:
Mr. Christopher Horne from the German of Herr
were
Arthur Schnitzler, is an extremely powerful littie
trian
play, and a remarkable one, moreover. There is
close
practically no action; the man on whom everything
the s
depends never moves from thechair in which, indeed,
tinct
he is dying, and yet the simple little drama holds the
first 1
audience irredistibly. In an extra ward of the Vienna
wires
General Hospital Karl Rademacher’s life is ebbing
away. His career has been a failure. He has worked jset 1
Manz
hard as a hack journalist to earn a scanty wage, and
office
what has made it all the more bitter is that, while he
has gone down his old companion, Alexander
prest
Weihgart, no cleverer or more capable Rade¬
from
macher is conzinced, has steadily asconded.
His own earnest desire is to meet the man he regards
liant
as his successful rival, to let him know that his friend¬
grout
ship has been a pretence, that he hates him; and be
proac.
is overjoyed when the Doctor consents to ask
wires
Weihgart to come. There is au actor, Floriar
firem
Schubart, also in the hospital, and he suggests #
dente
Frehearsal of the coming scene; hewill be Weihgart—
arouf
what has Rademacher to say to him? The writer
spect.
begins his venomous tirade, he casts the mask aside,
area.
tells the other what he has longed to tell, and winds
down
up with a cruel stab—Weihgart’s wife, he
piece:
declares, has been his mistress. Erhausted by the
tire,
effort, for his wrath has carried him beyond bis
sever.
strength, he is lying quietly back in his chair
and
when Weihgart arrives, and begins to talk
soothingly, to lament his old comrade’s misfortunes,
found
to speak of the disappointments and irritations that
wonn
have constantly affected himseif in the midst of his
Aft
apparent prosperity; and Rademacher is gradually
was o
moved to gentler thoughts, his fury passes; when the
had b
allotted quarter of an hour has gone the two part
thete
in all kindness, Weihgart never dreaming that any
d
Telep
hard thought has been in his old friend’s mind. Mr.
5•
worst
J. D. Beveridge plays Rademacher with striking force
k
Some
and finish. Complex as the dving man’s fancies may
excha
be, they are always expressed with perfect clearness.
#t
fire w.
The actor, who does nothing ill, has certainly not for

set te
along time done auything better; it is a study which
he
will dwell in the recollection of those who see it,
hoped
Mr. George Trollope was also excellent as Schu¬
he
to-day
bart, but Mr. Rudge Harding, as Weihgart,
lacked sincerity; his manner, indeed, rather
hi¬
expressed patronage than sympathy, and the reason
NA
ed
for the change in Rademacher was not made so com¬
vi¬
prehensible as it should have been. The doctor was
rer
well played by Mr. Howard Sturge and the nurse by
1el
Miss Isabel Grey.
ed
THE
MR. B. SHAW'S FARCE.
Mr. Bernard Shaw wound upthe programme with a
rt,
farce which exhibits his fantastic humour at its
st
wildest. How He Lied to Her Husband is the title of
this extraordinarily diverting piece.“ He' is an un¬
fiedged vouth called Henry Apjohn, and the lady with
us
M.P., 1
the husband—a blunt, uuromantio stockbroker—is
he
Nation:
Mrs. Aurora Bumpus. Henry loves her with just the
-
yesterd
same absorbing devotion that Eugene in Candida
ne
The
feels for the clergyman’s excellent wife, and he begs
bt
year 1
her to share his lot—simply to walk out of
that of
the house, and take up her residence with him,
forthe
ignoring the man who“ may have loved her
E17,668
as much as bis sordid nature and commercial environ¬
showin
ment rendered possible.“ But she has something
for the
eise to think of. She is in sore trouble. He has
those o
written her ardent verses, Aurora is the burden of
and oti
all of them, and these verses have, she is convinced,
the rat“